Month: February 2019

Session 96: Exploring Vulnerability

The Therapy for Black Girls Podcast is a weekly conversation with Dr. Joy Harden Bradford, a Licensed Psychologist in Atlanta, Georgia, about all things mental health, personal development, and all the small decisions we can make to become the best possible version of ourselves.

In this week’s episode we’re digging into vulnerability. For this conversation I was joined by Chasity Chandler, LMHC, MCAP, ICADC, CST, CDWF. Chasity and I chatted about what makes it so difficult for us to be vulnerable, how to be more vulnerable when you have no idea where to start, vulnerability in the workplace, and what vulnerability might look like in romantic relationships. 

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Naturalicious

Resources Mentioned

Visit our Amazon Store for all the books mentioned on the podcast!

Where to Find Chasity

https://centerforsexualhealthandwellness.com/

Facebook: @catalystforchange2016

Twitter: @chasforchange

Instagram: @chasforchange

If you’re looking for a therapist in your area, check out the directory at https://www.therapyforblackgirls.com/directory.

Take the info from the podcast to the next level by joining us in The Yellow Couch Collective, therapyforblackgirls.com/ycc

To keep digging into today’s topic and other topics discussed on the podcast, join the Facebook group at https://www.therapyforblackgirls.com/tribe.

Grab your copy of our guided affirmation and other TBG Merch at therapyforblackgirls.com/shop.

Join me for this week’s Three for Thursday chat on FB & IG Live, Thursday at 12 noon ET.

If you have questions or would like to discuss podcast sponsorship, email us at podcast@therapyforblackgirls.com.

The hashtag for the podcast is #TBGinSession.

Make sure to follow us on social media:

Twitter: @therapy4bgirls

Instagram: @therapyforblackgirls

Facebook: @therapyforblackgirls

Session 95: Unpacking Toxic Masculinity

The Therapy for Black Girls Podcast is a weekly conversation with Dr. Joy Harden Bradford, a Licensed Psychologist in Atlanta, Georgia, about all things mental health, personal development, and all the small decisions we can make to become the best possible version of ourselves.

In this week’s episode we’re unpacking toxic masculinity. For this conversation, I was joined by Dr. Alduan Tartt, Licensed Psychologist. Dr. Tartt and I discussed what is meant by the term toxic masculinity,  how it shows up in our lives, and how we can stop perpetuating it, especially in raising our sons. 

 

Support Our Sponsor

Naturalicious

Resources Mentioned

Visit our Amazon Store for all the books mentioned on the podcast!

Soul City Research Project

Red Table Talk

NBA Mental Health Campaign

Where to Find Dr. Tartt

https://www.drtartt.com/

Facebook: @dralduantartt

Twitter: @drtartt

Instagram: @drtartt

To get updates from Dr. Tartt, text “TARTT” to 22828

If you’re looking for a therapist in your area, check out the directory at https://www.therapyforblackgirls.com/directory.

Take the info from the podcast to the next level by joining us in The Yellow Couch Collective, therapyforblackgirls.com/ycc

To keep digging into today’s topic and other topics discussed on the podcast, join the Facebook group at https://www.therapyforblackgirls.com/tribe.

Grab your copy of our guided affirmation and other TBG Merch at therapyforblackgirls.com/shop.

Join me for this week’s Three for Thursday chat on FB & IG Live, Thursday at 12 noon ET.

If you have questions or would like to discuss podcast sponsorship, email us at podcast@therapyforblackgirls.com.

The hashtag for the podcast is #TBGinSession.

Make sure to follow us on social media:

Twitter: @therapy4bgirls

Instagram: @therapyforblackgirls

Facebook: @therapyforblackgirls

Session 94: Keep Your Eyes On Your Own Paper

The Therapy for Black Girls Podcast is a weekly conversation with Dr. Joy Harden Bradford, a Licensed Psychologist in Atlanta, Georgia, about all things mental health, personal development, and all the small decisions we can make to become the best possible version of ourselves.

In this week’s episode I shared my thoughts about something that seems to be coming up more and more in conversation, comparing ourselves to others. I shared several reasons this is dangerous and some tips to help you do a better job of keeping your focus on you!
Grab your copy of A Loving Reminder at https://www.therapyforblackgirls.com/lovingreminder
If you’re looking for a therapist in your area, check out the directory at https://www.therapyforblackgirls.com/directory.

Don’t forget to grab a sweatshirt, mug, or a copy of our guided breakup journal at therapyforblackgirls.com/shop.

To take the concepts from the podcast to the next level in a community of supportive sisters, join us in The Yellow Couch Collective.

If you have questions or would like to discuss podcast sponsorship, email us at podcast@therapyforblackgirls.com.

The hashtag for the podcast is #TBGinSession.

Make sure to follow us on social media:

Twitter: @therapy4bgirls

Instagram: @therapyforblackgirls

Facebook: @therapyforblackgirls

Where My Girls At? The Importance of a Strong Support System


Research suggests that a strong support system is key in maintaining our mental health. Having people we can count on provides protective factors against depression, it enhances our sense of confidence and esteem, buffers us against stress, makes us feel less isolated,  and helps to hold us accountable when we set goals. However, in order for us to reap these benefits, our support system must be both functional and utilized. A support system is not just a bunch of people who call when they need a ride or who update you on the latest office gossip. Our support system should be made up of people who actually show up when they say they will, allow us to show all parts of ourselves and who provide us with what we need and in the ways that we need it. This is not something that happens overnight and it may take some time to curate this group but it is well worth the effort. Here are some tips that may help you to create and better utilize your support system. (more…)

3 Simple Ways to Incorporate Mindfulness Into Your Routine

When thinking about mindfulness and meditation, people generally imagine themselves sitting cross-legged on a floor, eyes shut and “omm”ing until their thoughts come to a screeching halt. This is an extremely common misconception, but the good news is that you don’t have to hold onto it for long!  By definition, meditation is an umbrella term that encompasses ultimate concentration and consciousness by self-regulating the mind; mindfulness is a form of meditation where the act is focusing on being fully present. Meditating can even be done through everyday acts such as listening to music, doing yoga, or journaling. Keep in mind that the goal of meditation is not to “turn off” the mind; rather, the goal is to acknowledge thoughts and feelings that arise without getting stuck in them. Below are three simple ways to incorporate mindfulness and meditation into your routine:

Engage in a 3-minute journal exercise.
Keeping a journal allows you to track patterns and growth over time. Set a timer and spend three full minutes free-writing and recording every thought that you’re able to catch, doing your best not to control your thoughts. Maybe you’ll notice a pattern or a specific theme that arose. Multiply the number of thoughts that you recorded by twenty –  this is about how many thoughts you have in an hour, and it shows how quickly our minds operate without us being aware. I recommend engaging in this activity almost every morning or evening before bed; it may give you insight into how you’re truly feeling and what you’re truly thinking before the day starts, or how your day impacted you when it’s finished.

Make a Sponge list.
I am subscribed to Shine, a self-care app that sends me a research-backed mindfulness tip every weekday for struggles like stress, anxiety, time management, and more. One of the tips Shine sent me this past summer was creating a Sponge list. Good vibes and energy come from two places: what we do and what we soak in. When we solely focus on what we want to “do” in a given week, we forget what we can “take” from a week too. I begin each week by either writing down these three questions or making a mental checklist: What do I want to feel? What do I want to learn? What do I want to unlearn? This helps me start my week with an intention that I aim to align myself with.

Practice mindful eating.
Eating is one of the ultimate self-care practices because it’s necessary for our survival, energy, and peak levels of functioning. Our current society leaves little room to enjoy meals and actually taste the ingredients and time that went into them, especially during the week when schedules tend to be busier. Our current society also leaves little room to notice effects that food has on our feelings, figures, and hunger triggers (it takes the brain up to 20 minutes to realize you’re full) . Engaging in mindful eating can be helpful in understanding physical cues and cravings when eating. If we all we engaged in mindful eating more regularly (cue a “slow dowwwwn” echo), our brains and bodies would most certainly thank us later.


Juliana R. Collins is a licensed social worker practicing in Philadelphia, and received her Master of Social Work from the University of Pennsylvania. Currently, Juliana works as a substance abuse therapist for an intensive outpatient program at Center City Recovery LLC. Juliana is skilled in DBT practices and sexual assault counseling. To contact Juliana, email her at jcollins@centercityrecovery.com

Session 93: Managing Valentine’s Day Stress

The Therapy for Black Girls Podcast is a weekly conversation with Dr. Joy Harden Bradford, a Licensed Psychologist in Atlanta, Georgia, about all things mental health, personal development, and all the small decisions we can make to become the best possible version of ourselves.

In this week’s episode I shared a few tips to help you manage Valentine’ Day stress whether you’re single or in a relationship. 
If you’re looking for a therapist in your area, check out the directory at https://www.therapyforblackgirls.com/directory.

Don’t forget to grab a sweatshirt, mug, or a copy of our guided breakup journal at therapyforblackgirls.com/shop.

To take the concepts from the podcast to the next level in a community of supportive sisters, join us in The Yellow Couch Collective.

If you have questions or would like to discuss podcast sponsorship, email us at podcast@therapyforblackgirls.com.

The hashtag for the podcast is #TBGinSession.

Make sure to follow us on social media:

Twitter: @therapy4bgirls

Instagram: @therapyforblackgirls

Facebook: @therapyforblackgirls

Valentine’s Day: Celebrating love in all of its forms

Here’s the truth about Valentine’s Day. People have very different relationships with the celebration in question. If you’re not in a relationship, you might not think you’re the kind of person who should be celebrating. You might feel that way if you’re IN a relationship. And, that’s not so. You can use Valentine’s Day to celebrate love in all of its forms. And as corny as it sounds, you can celebrate love any day, even if it’s not a romantic for of love.

For the month of February (and with Valentine’s Day as our inspiration), Therapy for Black Girls is calling out the ways you can celebrate love– love for others, love for experiences and love for yourself. We’ll be talking about the ways we can be in healthier relationships and navigate our way out of toxic ones.

To kick off this month of love, whether you’re in a relationship or not, here are a few ways you can celebrate love in all of its forms: 

You can celebrate anyone, just pick someone!  
Think about some of the most wonderful humans in this life. Now, think about the ones you have access to. Find a way to celebrate them! You can have a super fun Galentine’s day. You can celebrate your mother, father, sister or any other a close relative. Hit up an aunt and let her know you’re thinking of her. Chances are, they’ll reciprocate the love.

Be around the little ones in your life.
Remember the childlike excitement you got in third grade when you exchanged Valentine’s Day cards with classmates? That contagious joy may help you get into the spirit of love. Another idea: send Valentine’s Day books or cards to the little ones in your life.

Decorate your house.
Celebrate the love you have for your personal space. Ribbon, confetti, a scented candle is enough.

RELATED: Session 8: Getting What You Need in Relationships

Affirm yourself
When we affirm ourselves we’re amen-ing the things we love about ourselves. Try saying the following out loud:
‘I have a kind heart,’
I am confident in my body,’
‘I am beautiful,’
‘I am strong,’
‘I respect my body,’
Repeat.

Hop on the phone.
If you don’t even know how to begin with these affirmations, do it with a friend! Call up someone close to you and take turns saying things you like about the other person. Write their words down on paper. Repeat it out loud and practice internalizing their words. Here’s a prompt to get you started: What are five things that make me special?

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER: Make sure you snag friends who will talk exclusively about the good things, not just your growth areas.

RELATED: Session 57: The Do’s of Dating

Compliment someone.
Practice giving love by giving complimenting others. Maybe push yourself to compliment someone you don’t talk to very often.

Practice gratitude.
Be still for a moment. Look around you and focus on the things that make you feel grateful. Did you accomplish a goal recently? If so, take the time to recognize that and thank yourself for doing what was needed to reach that goal.

Celebrate February 15th
Always remember, the best part about Valentine’s Day is February 15th when all that Vaelntine’s Day chocolate goes on sale! Treat yo self!